Biology Department Birdwatch

Biology Department Birdwatch
On the morning of Wednesday 10th February, teachers and pupils from Thirds to Upper Sixth a5ended this year’s Annual Virtual Birdwatch. From the comfort of our homes, we listened to song thrushes and watched magpies tearing up nests and lawns! Even seagulls trekked upon the gardens, and some quite aggressive...

On the morning of Wednesday 10th February, teachers and pupils from Thirds to Upper Sixth a5ended this year’s Annual Virtual Birdwatch. From the comfort of our homes, we listened to song thrushes and watched magpies tearing up nests and lawns! Even seagulls trekked upon the gardens, and some quite aggressive gulls were spotted. On Miss Buckley’s camera, we were able to see a long-tailed 8t, two bluetits and also robins, even a thrush was sighted near the bird feeders which were situated by a large bush that all the birds evidently liked for nesting and resting. Some of us were lucky enough to see some goldfinches, in their elegant prowess. Woodpeckers, starlings, and house sparrows were all among the list of sighted birds. I got to see many different birds myself, varying from chaffinches to starlings, with one of the starlings flying over the roof and shimmering iridescently in the sunlight. I was able to sight a woodpecker nest in a neighbour’s garden which overlooked my window. Amazingly, I also spotted an entire flock of carrion crows that nested in the tallest, topmost, towering tree in the neighbourhood and I was lucky enough to see them all flying into the sunset. It was certainly an exciting experience, and even though we were at home, it was definitely just as special! Thirds and Lower Fourths were fortunate enough to continue with the theme of birdwatching in their Biology lessons that week. The birds observed were: Blue tit, Great tit, Long tailed tit, Coal tit, Blackbird, Robin, Dunnock, House sparrow, Goldfinch, Chaffinch, Black cap, Fieldfare, Starling, Song thrush, Crow, Magpie, Wood pigeon and Seagull. Special mention must go to Gull in the Upper Sixth for the best sighting of Fieldfares, and for attending every Birdwatch since the inaugural one (2015) as a Third! We hope that you continue to birdwatch and have many rare sightings as you move on to pastures new this summer.

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